A Travellerspoint blog

TMWH?

TMI Perhaps, But Never TMWH

Too Much Wyoming History? How could there be too much Wyoming history when there is so much available in less than 100 miles in any direction!

I awoke around 4 AM on the cliff overlooking Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park. Another car had pulled into the parking lot during the night but they weren't up and stirring yet. It was hardly dawn and the smoke still hung heavy in the air, but I could no longer see flames across the water..
It took me about three minutes to decide I would head East and leave the park.
Route 26/287 is a nice drive into Dubois. The history as to why they call it DewBoys instead of the correct French pronunciation is interesting I will let you read it if you want,
I stopped for breakfast, but the conversation at the surrounding tables and the Vote for A.B.O. and Make America Great Again posted everywhere I looked made me want to just get on the road after I had enough coffee.

The 100 miles to Riverton doesn't seem to stand out in my memory, but I stopped there because of the two museums shown on my paper map.
The new curator at the Fremont County Museum has worked diligently to make a haphazard collection of donations into nice displays. It is in a former church with at least three additions of different bricks.
Riverton Museum

Riverton Museum


Conjoined Calves

Conjoined Calves


I saw two things I had never seen: a very unusual lady's evening bag that is too difficult to explain and a bushel basket rim used as a hoop for weaving chair pads from old stockings.
Signs directed the way to the site of the 1838 Rendezvous. I discovered later, however, that I had not followed them correctly when I expressed my disappointment at what I found.
Not the Site of the 1838 Rendezvous

Not the Site of the 1838 Rendezvous


Another place just down Federal Street is the Wind River Wildlife Center and Wax Museum. All the contents in these two buildings are private collections. The taxidermy for the over 100 animals has all been performed by a father and son. (The father is no longer living and the son is probably close to my age.)
The entire collection is almost overwhelming, but very nicely displayed and labeled, However, it appears they don't let you view it on your own. At first, I thought the woman who kept talking to me was just being friendly. Then, I realized she was going to tell me in detail about every stuffed animal. Then she took me into the wax museum and recited entire histories of the characters in each display. After 2 1/2 hours, even I had to say that I had to get on the road.
"Wait, wait," she said. "I want to tell you about the importance of Wyoming in women's suffrage." I already knew Wyoming was the first state to allow women the right to vote and inherit property, but she wouldn't let me get away.
Two in One Wildlife and Wax Museum

Two in One Wildlife and Wax Museum


How Can She Remember All This

How Can She Remember All This

Less than 30 miles southwest is Lander with two more museums. I thought I had better check these out. I don't think that there is more history in this part of the world than elsewhere. I just think that a larger percentage of the small population believes it should be remembered and displayed.
The Fremont County Museum contains well-designed and curated displays. They let you view it independently and aren't very helpful even when you ask them a question!
Fremont County Pioneer Museum

Fremont County Pioneer Museum


Father of Lander Was Italian

Father of Lander Was Italian


The Museum of the West is a collection of settler buildings moved from throughout the county to this location. It is run by volunteers, donations and grants; the county museum across the parking lot is supported by the county.
Museum of The American West

Museum of The American West


Gave Me a Private Tour

Gave Me a Private Tour


You can't travel this part of the country without learning about Chief Washakie.
Chief Washakie

Chief Washakie


Sacajawea Cemetery is in Fort Washakie on the Wind River Reservation
Sacajawea Cemetery

Sacajawea Cemetery


Beautiful Natural Cemetery

Beautiful Natural Cemetery


Sacajawea Statue

Sacajawea Statue


You Can Sprinkle Me Here

You Can Sprinkle Me Here


Or Maybe Here

Or Maybe Here


Historic Episcopal School

Historic Episcopal School


Sacajawea Had a Son Named Bazil

Sacajawea Had a Son Named Bazil


On the road, I had passed a sign to Castle Gardens. I asked about it at more than one museum and learned it was a grand display of ancient petroglyphs. I decided to spend the night in Sinks Canyon State Park and head out to site in the morning.
Sinks Canyon Campground

Sinks Canyon Campground


A Cool Spot Along the Creek

A Cool Spot Along the Creek


This is a beautiful park, so called because here the Popo Agie sinks underground into caverns too narrow to be explored, One quarter mile and two and a half hours later, the water surfaces into a beautiful pool were fantastically large trout live.
Here Is the Sink

Here Is the Sink


The Rise Is Long and Calm

The Rise Is Long and Calm


Some Rather Fine Trout

Some Rather Fine Trout


The trout grow so large because fishing is prohibited in this spot. They also sell handfuls of food you can toss in to the fish.
Lander was a surprising young, healthy, and liberal looking town. I asked one person about it, but she was so busy answering work-related email she told me she didn't have time to chat with me. The Wikipedia link gives you a bit more information. I think Lander is my favorite town in Wyoming.
Who Knew Lander Was Such a Hip Place

Who Knew Lander Was Such a Hip Place


I had been told it would be about 45 miles on the prairie to Castle Gardens. Actually, it was more like 70. I passed two ranches and two compressor stations - which I had no idea what they were until I Googled it just now!
Compressor Stations
Colorado Emergency Contact Number

Colorado Emergency Contact Number


I think this is the only time I felt unsure about traveling alone. Fortunately, I had filled up the gas tank before I left Lander. For some reason, I kept thinking I might have car trouble and no phone service.
40 Some Miles Along This Road

40 Some Miles Along This Road


30 Some Miles on This Road

30 Some Miles on This Road


A Mile Walk Along This Path

A Mile Walk Along This Path


This Is What You Will See

This Is What You Will See


Many Like This

Many Like This


And This

And This


Someone Stole This One

Someone Stole This One


There were several archeologists from around the country being escorted by some Wyoming archeologists. I made sure I left the site before they did and asked them to stop if they saw me stranded.
Strange Formatios in a Flat Land

Strange Formatios in a Flat Land


I Think I Have Visited Enough Places for a While

I Think I Have Visited Enough Places for a While


I decided it was time to head home. I managed to coast into a gas station about 40 miles inside the Colorado state line and arrived in Denver about 10:30 PM.

Posted by pscotterly 08:34 Archived in USA Tagged wyoming Comments (0)

Grand Teton National Park

This One Is for You, Dominique

When Dominique and I started this trip the first week of May, she had hoped we could visit Grand Teton Park. The snow was still deep and the south gate in Yellowstone that led to Grand Teton was not open for the season.
I thought I would visit on my way home so I could share it with her through this blog.
What I Saw of the Tetons

What I Saw of the Tetons


When I arrived in Jackson, I learned the North half of the road through the park was closed due to forest fires and drifting smoke.
To the East of the Tetons

To the East of the Tetons


View to the North

View to the North


That is smoke from forest fire - not clouds.
I decided I would drive north as far as the road was open and then turn East
A Bike Path Runs Through It

A Bike Path Runs Through It


The bike path actually starts at the top of Teton Pass. It was there I saw many daredevil cyclists in knee and wrist pads taking this trail where the speed limit for cars is 25 MPH. Don't try this bike trail if you ride a single speed cruiser!
Of course, there are bike lanes throughout Jackson. Then this paved path continues north along route 191 and also along the National Park Loop road to Jenny Lake.
It was after 1 PM and at least 85 degrees. As you can see in the pictures, this path does not pass through bucolic farms and shaded glens as the one on Vancouver Island did. Still, I could not imagine coming all the way to Grand Teton National Park and not riding my bike for at least a mile along this perfectly smooth trail.
After riding two or three miles, I pictured the map in my mind and thought a Visitor Center must not be far. I decided to ride for another mile. If the Visitor Center didn't appear, I would return to the van.
Soon, I saw the tunnel junction pictured above. The Visitor Center was less than a mile after the tunnel,
At the center, I learned a Ranger presentation would begin in less than 30 minutes at Historic Menor's Ferry.
There was a long line at the Ranger's information desk, so I chatted with the souvenir sales staff and told them I was on my bike and wanted to get to Menor's Ferry.
"It's just up the road past the entrance gates with bike trail all the way," I was told. I distinctly remember references to 1/4 mile and one little hill just before you get there.
I headed out. In less than 1 mile, I passed the entrance gate. Less than a mile later I saw a very steep hill. I assumed this was the one little hill and struggled at least one mile to the top.
The terrain did not change. It remained exactly ad shown in the pictures above. Each ridge of trees in the distance, I imagined I would find a turn off to a river and a ferry.
To make a long, hot story shorter, I eventually arrived at Jenny Lake and the end of the bike path. I walked the pedestrian trails and asked about Menor's Ferry. No one really knew what I was talking about, but I eventually found a boat launch that took rides across Jenny Lake. There, the concessionaires informed me I had passed Menor's Ferry eight miles back!
Now, really, I had gone less than 12 miles and ridden less than one hour. But I felt like a Mormon with my push cart who did not have the stamina of my faith to get on the road again. The sun was even brighter, the temperature was even higher, and the smoke from the fires hung even heavier.
I had no desire to prove I could do it. Pain and perseverance has never been a part of my amusement routine.
I decided to look for possible vehicles in the parking lot that might have room for one bike and one old lady.
Fortunately, there is a big construction project going on at the Jenny Lake area. I soon found someone that was ending his shift and heading back to Jackson. It was no problem to toss my bike in the back of the truck with his and drop me off where Ol' '95 was patiently waiting for my return.
Thanks, Howard

Thanks, Howard


I drove along the park Loop to see where I went wrong.
How Did I Miss This Sign

How Did I Miss This Sign


I remember seeing this sign, but from my bike on the path across the road I could not see the entire second line. I assumed there was an arrow pointing ahead because I did not know the chapel was in the same historic district as the ferry - and besides, I had also seen that hill looming ahead that I assumed I had been told about.
Later, I returned to the souvenir desk and told them about my journey. They were proud I made it up the hill in that heat at my age and physical shape, but sorry I missed the ranger talk.
On my own, I visited the historic Menor store and ferry.
More Than My Shadow Could Have Been on This Ferry

More Than My Shadow Could Have Been on This Ferry


Menor's Historic Store

Menor's Historic Store


I enjoyed my private tour and learned much about the area through the placards and self-guided trail brochure. As early as 1923, residents of the valley were worried about all the commercial activity in the area and met in this cabin to urge the government to create an area next to Yellowstone that would be preserved.
Historic Noble Cabin

Historic Noble Cabin


View from Historic Chapel Altar

View from Historic Chapel Altar


1 of 4 Seasons Windows

1 of 4 Seasons Windows


All the campgrounds were crowded and hot.
Smoke Stays in the Valley

Smoke Stays in the Valley


I decided to spend the night in the parking lot of the Chapel of the Sacred Heart on the east side of Jenny Lake.
while it was light I could see the smoke rise from the forest on the other end. I watched the helicopters fly their empty buckets homeward after filling them in Jackson Lake all day.
When it was dark, I could see constant flames on the horizon. I was glad I was on this side of the lake.

Posted by pscotterly 15:05 Archived in USA Tagged wyoming Comments (0)

Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Birthplace of Western Dude Ranch

I have always known of Jackson Hole and Jackson, Wyoming. However, I didn't really know anything about it.
One of the Famous Antler Arches

One of the Famous Antler Arches


I drove down the mountain and into town with the traffic getting heavier with every quarter mile. By the time I arrived in the town square, cars and tourists were inching along getting in each other's way.
I made my way directly to the Visitor Center to assess what I would do next. I thought I really couldn't stay in all that hubbub of the town. Perhaps I would just head on into Grand Teton Park which almost abuts the north side of the town limits
There, I learned that the northern half of Grand Teton National Park was closed due to fires. I could assume that every inch of the southern half wold be almost as crowded as the town of Jackson.
I researched on line and contacted two different lodges. Both were roughly the same price of $240 a night. Everything else was closer to $400 or a place I wouldn't want to stay.
The Alpine House Lodge was less than five blocks off the town square, but it might have been in the next county! It was peaceful with no traffic. I was probably the noisiest thing around.
Garden of the Alpine Lodge

Garden of the Alpine Lodge


My Balcony Room at the Alpine Lodge

My Balcony Room at the Alpine Lodge


I caught up with my photos and then cleaned up for dinner. I found The Kitchen just two blocks away and didn't even need to get near the town square.
Nice Deck Nice Menu

Nice Deck Nice Menu


Pork Chop and Gimlet at The Kitchen

Pork Chop and Gimlet at The Kitchen


I dallied so long over my dinner and drink that I missed the 7:00 PM Taize service at the historic St John's Episcopal church. I arrived just in time to hear the musicians play their last note and then pack up their instruments. I might visit one held in Denver.
Taize Service at Episcopal Chapel

Taize Service at Episcopal Chapel


I took a little walk around the lodge. Everyplace in Jackson is geared towards the tourist and being pleasing to the eye.
Every Spot Attractive

Every Spot Attractive


Well, Almost Every Spot

Well, Almost Every Spot


This used goods shop was two doors from the lodge. I think they leave everything in the yard not only because the interior is full, but hoping that someone will help themselves to what they want and clear it out. I did not see anything that I wanted.

I got on my bicycle about 6 AM the next morning to ride around town when the streets were clear. The main place to visit is the town square. Shops circle the square and continue for about two blocks in all four directions.
More Antlers More Shops

More Antlers More Shops


Blocks of Bars, Gift Shops, and Galleries

Blocks of Bars, Gift Shops, and Galleries


Sculpture Galleries for People Who Can Afford It

Sculpture Galleries for People Who Can Afford It


Did Einstein Ever Visit Here

Did Einstein Ever Visit Here


All I wanted to find was a Christmas shop. It seems that every tourist town has one. Not Jackson Wyoming! I did, however find a yarn shop. (She who dies with the most yarn wins.)
Clever Name for a Yarn Shop on Pearl Street

Clever Name for a Yarn Shop on Pearl Street


I Do What the Sign Says

I Do What the Sign Says


I was a little puzzled why they showed a cowboy on a bucking bronco to commemorate John Colter because I think he spent more time on foot than busting broncos.
John Colter Memorial

John Colter Memorial


Jackson has excellent museums, I visited two: Indians of the Greater Yellowstone Museum and Jackson Hole History Museum
Excellent Museums

Excellent Museums


It was here that I learned that Jackson, Wyoming has been a tourist attraction almost since it was settled. The first homesteaders were allotted 160 acres - enough for a supporting farm in the east, but barely enough to survive on here in the hole with it's 60 day growing season and not enough vegetation to feed even a few head of cattle. All settlers continued to eat wild game so they could sell every head they were able to raise. (Even today, it is estimated each head requires 40 acres!)
Yellowstone Park was founded in 1872 and the lodge started serving tourists around 1904. By 1908, ranchers in Jackson Hole started offering Dude Ranch experiences as a way to survive in the area. Therefore, Jackson (named in the late1890s) has always been a tourist town! With the first ski tow rope built on Teton Pass in the 1930s, it only became more popular.

So, now I know all about Jackson, Wyoming and Jackson Hole. I will never confuse the name of the city with the name of the valley again.

Posted by pscotterly 08:32 Archived in USA Tagged wyoming Comments (0)

Along Routes 93, 26, and a Few Others

Corners of Montana and Idaho

AhYes

AhYes


I have visited my friends in Stevensville, Montana several times, but have never visited the local museums. I was too early for the county museum.
Not Open Yet

Not Open Yet


I was too early for St Mary's Mission also, but the current church was open and I could also tour the grounds.
The pioneer church served the parish until the 1950s when this new church was built. The stained glass windows on each side are of the history of the area.
1950's Church

1950's Church


Beautiful Windows

Beautiful Windows


New and Old

New and Old


Oldest Apple Tree in Montana

Oldest Apple Tree in Montana


Indian Graves

Indian Graves


The museum opened before I left, so I was able to get an interior tour of several buildings and watch a video. The history of this place where the settling of Montana began is very interesting.
The local Salish had heard of the special spiritual medicine of the Black Robes. They decided to ask some to come and settle on their land. For some years, there was a great deal of cooperation and mutual support between the priests, brothers, and Salish. Then, the black robes traveled to the plains for a buffalo hunt with the Salish. It was then they learned that the desire for Catholic worship was to give the Salish power over the warring Blackfeet. This caused a bit of a schism between the priests and the Salish. The church and priests remained, however.
The other buildings and land fell into disrepair after the new church was built. Eventually, concerned Stevensville residents realized the historical importance of this site and restored it to its current condition and importance. Although the cemetery is still the Catholic cemetery, I caught a hint of disdain in the docent's voice as she implied that their was little, if any, church or parishioner involvement in the restoration and maintenance.
I had managed to fritter away over half a day on these grounds. I needed to get on the road south.
No Blue Sky

No Blue Sky


Smoke and Snow on the Mountains

Smoke and Snow on the Mountains


The town of Darby, Montana did not seem to have anyplace I wanted to stop except I couldn't pass up getting on the internet in this oasis of a library that serves the 720 residents of the town and, I suppose, folks from the surrounding area.
Just One of America's Wonderful Libraries

Just One of America's Wonderful Libraries


After 50 more miles, I crossed into Idaho.
No Snow to Measure Today

No Snow to Measure Today


Tired of Driving

Tired of Driving


I felt more like reading and munching than driving, so I stopped at the last campground with a few spots. I chose the spot on the marina away from the folks with five barking rescue dogs.
Still Smoky in the AM

Still Smoky in the AM


In 2014 when I drove north on Route 93, I just drove through Arco intent to get to Stevensville.
Steve in Stevensville had told me that the 2017 eclipse will be 100% in Arco, Idaho. I thought I should stop for a visit this time.
Arco's claim to history is that it was the first place powered by nuclear energy. Did I read that it was only powered for one hour? Guess I had better look back over my links.
Arco Museum

Arco Museum


Arco Science Center

Arco Science Center


Additionally, they have placed the sail from the nuclear-powered USS Hawkbill here on the desert.
The View from the Museum

The View from the Museum


Class Years on the Mountain

Class Years on the Mountain


With lava fields, nuclear submarine memorabilia, decades of class numbers on the mountainside, nuclear energy "museum" ,and grain elevators, all in all, Arco is a rather unusual place out here in the middle of nowhere.
I did not take the side trip to Atomic City, but the nuclear energy research still continues and is evident along the route.
Why Area Chosen for Nuclear Energy Research

Why Area Chosen for Nuclear Energy Research


I Am Glad They Are Cautious

I Am Glad They Are Cautious


This Is a Straight Flat Road

This Is a Straight Flat Road


Not Much on the Lava Land

Not Much on the Lava Land


Except Mormons

Except Mormons


It was surprising to travel such empty roads and then to see Mormon churches with packed parking lots fill the landscape.
When I drove through Idaho Falls, I saw the Salt Lake City Express bus company! In Denver and throughout my travels in the SW and other agricultural areas, I have often seen express systems to Mexico, but the need for ths express caught me by surprise.

East of Idaho Falls, the land becomes more agricultural. There were huge rolling fields of golden grain. I couldn't imagine what it was. There were also vast fields of potatoes and seed potatoes.
Just before I started the climb up the mountain to the Wyoming state line the land turned to mostly cattle grazing, I saw some ranchers working on their property and I stopped to ask them what I had been seeing. I told them I recognized the Mormons and the potatoes, but was stymied by the golden grain. I learned it was barley; 90% had recently been harvested.
Shed a Bit of Light

Shed a Bit of Light


They told me to be sure and write that "this is how rednecks get the work done!"

Soon, I turned off 26 and took routes 31 and 33 to cross into Wyoming.
Headed into Jackson Hole

Headed into Jackson Hole

Posted by pscotterly 10:06 Archived in USA Tagged montana idaho Comments (0)

Route Redux

Seen from the Opposite Direction

Looking Down on My Campsite

Looking Down on My Campsite


I spent the morning in the lobby of the Prince of Wales Lodge looking over my previous campsite and warming up from the night in the van and the rain.
PofW Lobby 2

PofW Lobby 2


With the map spread out on the table, I was trying to decide where to go next - North, West, South when I realized the charge on my computer was getting low.
Uh Oh! Could not find my power cord. In my mind I could see it in the wall socket at the Pine Lodge in Whitefish, Montana; I could not picture it any place after that. A call to the hotel proved my mind's eye correct.
The Surface Pro uses a power cord you can only find at a Microsoft store or on line. I now knew which direction I would go! Back to Whitefish.
I decided to go West on the highway I had taken East when I headed to Calgary two weeks ago.
Where the Mountains Meet the Plains

Where the Mountains Meet the Plains


Wind Farm and Farm Farm

Wind Farm and Farm Farm

The World is a Beautiful Place

The World is a Beautiful Place


The view looked a bit different from this perspective, and I enjoyed the drive. This tree has stood on this spot for centuries. As First Nations and settlers crossed this spot, it stood as a beacon on the trail, A few years ago, the tree died and fell. Locals firmly placed it back in the ground and propped it up to continue as a point on the trail
Boundary Tree

Boundary Tree


On the spot of the Frank Slide I posted two weeks ago, I had to stop to take this photo looking into the valley near the town of Fernie.
Clouds in the Valley

Clouds in the Valley


Today in Fernie, I thought I should stop for a while and see why every periodical and website from Rolling Stone to The National Geographic rank Fernie among the top ski towns. I enjoyed my visit to the museum with excellent oral histories and a bit of reading at nice coffee house. They had copies of Kinfolk, a periodical I had never seen before. I was in much better spirits than when I stayed at Island Lake Lodge when I came through town earlier in the month.
Fernie Museum

Fernie Museum

How Much Longer

How Much Longer


From here, I drove through Grasmere and tried to spend all my Canadian dollars at the roadside market (It wasn't difficult with a cylinder of propane at $10 and gas price per liter not even posted but just what she wanted to charge.) to cross the border at Rooseville,
The border was backed up at two booths with at least 10 cars in both lines ahead of me and more arriving behind me. As I looked around, I saw that all cars had Alberta plates. I asked the border guard about this and he told me that "Every Friday, folks will drive 100 miles to save a few bucks at Walmart."
I guess it was not my imagination that goods in Canada are more expensive.

I picked up my power cord at the Pine Lodge in Whitefish. Then, once again, I sat with the map spread in front of me. Which direction now?
I had thought I wanted to travel West and then South through Idaho. Now, it seemed like so many, many miles.
I saw Missoula just South of me. I realized that my friends Tina and Steve were less than 150 miles away. I stayed with them in 2014 and Dominique and I stayed there this spring.
I had decided which direction I would go.
Sung to the tune of Willie Nelson's Can I Sleep In Your Arms Tonight, Lady , I sang
Can I sleep in your driveway tonight, Tina?
It's so old on this highway for so long.

I made my way to their welcoming home.

Posted by pscotterly 09:20 Archived in Canada Comments (0)

International Peace Park

Take a Walk on the South Side

I had seen Goat Haunt on the map in Glacier and learned the only way to reach it was by an 8 hour hike or a boat ride from Waterton. I chose the boat ride.
On The International on Waterton Lake

On The International on Waterton Lake


The Waterton Lakes Glacier Peace Park was the first park to cross the boundaries of two nations, It was formed in 1935 after Canadian and American Rotary Clubs worked with their national governments to establish it. Today, there are only about five others throughout the world.
Canada US Border from Waterton Lake

Canada US Border from Waterton Lake


Celebrating 100 Years with Ranger John Frank

Celebrating 100 Years with Ranger John Frank


This day, August 25th, was the actual 100th anniversary of the USA. I celebrated it with a nature walk to Rainbow Falls.
Show Your Passport to Take a Hike

Show Your Passport to Take a Hike


The birds and the animals don't recognize national boundaries. It seems fitting that our two nations also have this understanding on the border between these two parks. And we did until 9/11. Now, if you want to walk past the park shelter, you must show a passport.
On a Walk in the Park

On a Walk in the Park


Your Choice - Horse Ford or Suspension Bridge

Your Choice - Horse Ford or Suspension Bridge


The River Runs Clear

The River Runs Clear


Rainbow Falls

Rainbow Falls


Two Nations Two Parks One Peace Park

Two Nations Two Parks One Peace Park


The name Goat Haunt is left over from the "olden days." There haven't been any mountain goats here for almost 100 years! I chose to do this trip because I had not seen any goats while in Glacier Park.
Foiled again!

The boat ride between Waterton Village and Glacier is about an hour each way. They provide excellent commentary on the geology and history. Ranger John says to remember the words Silt, Tilt, Glide, Slide when understanding how the area was formed. I remember the words, but I will let you do further research if you want to understand how the mountains were formed millions of years ago.
Old Mountains Atop Young Mountains

Old Mountains Atop Young Mountains


And Then the Rain Began

And Then the Rain Began


After the hike, the rain began. It fluctuated between a drizzle and a steady stream until the next morning.
I felt I should officially register in an actual campground instead of claiming squatters' rights in the city picnic ground. It was not nearly as nice.
Okay But Picnic Park Was Nicer

Okay But Picnic Park Was Nicer


Stepstool Required

Stepstool Required


It was also odd that the post on which I was supposed to hang my registration was so high I could not reach it even with my step stool. My neighbor finally posted it for me.

Once again, I was not successful with any wildlife sighting. Everyone on the boat saw a bear. People in the campground saw one on the road.
The Only Bear I Saw

The Only Bear I Saw

After a night of cold and rain, I could not face fixing breakfast in the mud. Instead, I went to the Prince of Wales Lodge for a fine breakfast and a warm morning in the lobby.
Prince of Wales Lobby

Prince of Wales Lobby


The bellhops in the Glacier Lodge all wear railroad engineer coveralls, hats, and kerchiefs. They look like little boys in dress-up. Here they all wear Scottish kilts. This bellhop told me they all laugh at the costumes across the border. I wonder if the "engineers" laugh at their Northern peers.
Prince of Wales Bellhop

Prince of Wales Bellhop

From the Prince of Wales Front Lawn

From the Prince of Wales Front Lawn

Posted by pscotterly 20:15 Archived in Canada Comments (0)

International Peace Park - First Day

Waterton Lakes National Park

When I got in the van in the parking lot of the Pine Lodge in Whitefish I asked aloud, "North or South?"
I turned the key and decided North.
First I had to go a bit South and then East until I could head North.
Somewhere on the Way to Waterton

Somewhere on the Way to Waterton


Once again, I had to cross the border into Canada.
Once Again

Once Again


This time when he asked if I had any liquor I replied, "I have wine for my dinner in camp."
"No problem."
Really, I had six bottles because Safeway in Whitefish had a great sale with even lower prices if you purchased 6.
Then he asked, "Are you carrying any firearms, switchblades or knives?"
I replied, "I have my Swiss Army knife for camping."
"I hope so."
Why do they bother to ask these questions? It is like in the pre-9/11 days when they asked you if you packed your own luggage.

Looking Towards Waterton Lakes National<br /> Park

Looking Towards Waterton Lakes National
Park


I learned there was a Powwow at the Blackfoot Cultural Center in Waterton Village in the park. I had to go. It had been years since I had been to a powwow. I wanted to hear the drums and bend my knees to the rhythm.
Powwow Welcome

Powwow Welcome


Everybody Dance

Everybody Dance


Youth Fancy Dancing

Youth Fancy Dancing

Young Girl in Ribbon Dress

Young Girl in Ribbon Dress

Traqditional Male Dancer

Traqditional Male Dancer

Traditional Women Dance

Traditional Women Dance


Chief Traditional

Chief Traditional

Drumgroup

Drumgroup


My Favoriter Young Chicken Dancer

My Favoriter Young Chicken Dancer

Miss Confident

Miss Confident

Male Dancer

Male Dancer


Champion Dancers

Champion Dancers


Grassdancers

Grassdancers


Grandma, Grandchild, and Chiefs

Grandma, Grandchild, and Chiefs


Blackfoot Chicken Dancer Costumes

Blackfoot Chicken Dancer Costumes


I asked at the Cultural Center: In Canada, they are the Blackfoot; in US they say Blackfeet. Same Tribe, different preference.

The historic lodge in Waterton Lakes National Parks is named the Prince of Wales. It was also built by the Great Northern Railway as a tourist destination. It looms on the highest ridge over the lakes and the town.
Tipi and Prince of Wales Lodge

Tipi and Prince of Wales Lodge


After the powwow and a snack of bannock with Saskatoon (Service) berries, it was time to find a place for the night. In addition to the PofW Lodge, Waterton village has several motels and lodges. I wanted to camp.
Best Campsite in Waterton Lakes National Park

Best Campsite in Waterton Lakes National Park


All the campgrounds seemed so far away. I drove into a picnic grounds in town and had the perfect spot all to myself. I thought a Park patrol might come through and tell me to move on, but only a handful of dog walkers and lovers came and went the entire night,.
The magnificent PofW Lodge rose above me.
Prince of Wales Lodge

Prince of Wales Lodge


It was a perfect spot and just as wonderful in the morning.
Morning at Waterton Lake

Morning at Waterton Lake

Posted by pscotterly 19:13 Archived in Canada Comments (2)

Whitefish, Montana

Much To Do That I Did Not Do

Which comes first - the tourist or the town's charm?
I had imagined I would stay in Kalispell for a few days R and R. But there was nothing about its streets that made me want to stay. Whitefish was a few miles North. I chose it. Now, when I read the online information about Kalispell, I probably would have enjoyed it!
A Nice Touch

A Nice Touch


If you come to Whitefish, Montana, you will probably want to amble through the little shops that feature nice clothing, home decoration and furnishings, outdoor sporting supplies, artwork, and gift items.
Probably you will go to Big Mountain where every type of both summer and winter activity await the active tourist.
You will also go to Flathead Lake.
Nicely Restored Town

Nicely Restored Town


I did none of these exciting activities.
I did the mundane like get the Ol' '95 an oil change and do my laundry.
Ol' '95 at Reggie's

Ol' '95 at Reggie's


I slept in a kingsize bed at the Pine Lodge for three nights.
I organized my photos and caught up on my blog before I forgot everything I had done in the last week.
I ate BBQ at a friendly joint with Pig in the name. I also had a nice meal at Casey's.
Eat at Casey's

Eat at Casey's


I enjoyed myself for appetizers and huckleberry ice cream pie at the new Firebrand hotel.
A Fine Spot at the Firebrand Lounge

A Fine Spot at the Firebrand Lounge


Duck Confit

Duck Confit


I strolled through the Tuesday night market.
Tuesday Night Market

Tuesday Night Market


Several Good Vendors

Several Good Vendors


Of course, I rode my bike around to see a bit of the town and learn the history. (You can probably skip the museum.)
Railroad Built This Part of the Country

Railroad Built This Part of the Country


RR Was Important in Many Lives

RR Was Important in Many Lives


In a few hours, I will turn the key in Ol' '95 and decide if I am going North or South.

Posted by pscotterly 04:58 Archived in USA Tagged montana Comments (0)

On to the Next Adventure

Paula and Paola Go Separate Ways

Time to Say So Long

Time to Say So Long


Time for both of us to move on.
Paola had an 8 AM plane flight through Denver to New York LaGuardia. After two bus rides and a taxi, she should arrive at the Ananda Ashram by midnight.
A Bit Nervous

A Bit Nervous


I have been on the move day and night since August 4. I was ready to just chill in a motel room for a day or two,
A Bit Bigger Than the Back of the Van

A Bit Bigger Than the Back of the Van


Just Sit Here for a While

Just Sit Here for a While


A Nice View from My Balcony

A Nice View from My Balcony

Posted by pscotterly 17:42 Archived in USA Tagged montana Comments (0)

Paula and Paola

Wild West Adventures

Time to leave Two Medicine Campground.
Time to Break Camp

Time to Break Camp


Goodbye Clean Camp

Goodbye Clean Camp


Now, it was time for Paola to experience Western USA life, not just the vista and outdoor exercise.
We drove to Browning to visit the Museum of the Plains Indians.
Bead Vendors

Bead Vendors


We became fast friends with two artists, the museum staff, and a couple of vendors looking for tourist dollars. I think the Blackfeet are a little friendlier with strangers than some other Plains Tribes. Perhaps it is because they are so accustomed to travelers from around the world.
Sculpture of the Creation Story

Sculpture of the Creation Story


The museum has excellent displays and a well-produced media show.
A Short Rest on the Sleeping Pad

A Short Rest on the Sleeping Pad


After another picnic, we drove to Kalispell to stay with hosts found on Couch Surfing.
They told us the fair and rodeo was in town. We used their bathroom and immediately ran out to enjoy a night with the cowboys and cowgirls.

I was so interested in looking at the sheep, cattle, and goats that I forgot to take pictures.

I did not have the right kind of equipment to get good pictures at the rodeo.
Drone Used at the Rodeo

Drone Used at the Rodeo


I HATE Rodeo Clowns

I HATE Rodeo Clowns


Everybody Loves Rodeo

Everybody Loves Rodeo


Of course, all of rodeo is based on actual tasks that cowboys traditionally performed (well, maybe not cowgirl barrel racing). All the reservations I have traveled on and all the rodeos I have attended, I have never seen an Indian Relay Race. This also displays historical skill. There are some good video clips from this link. Perhaps it has become more frequent and popular since I left the Reservation 40 years ago!
Blackfeet riders had teams of three horses. They rode bareback racing around a regulation size racetrack. At the first lap, each rider jumped from his horse and jumped on another to complete another lap. This happened three times to determine the winner.
Indian Relay Was Very Exciting

Indian Relay Was Very Exciting


It was very exciting. A Blackfeet girl from Browning sitting behind us explained it all to us. Her grandfather had a team of horses in the championship race. They came in second.
Funnel Cake and Burgers

Funnel Cake and Burgers


By 11 PM, we returned to our hosts. Paola finally got to take a shower and sleep in a bed! Paula just climbed into the back of van.

Posted by pscotterly 17:18 Archived in USA Tagged montana glacier_natl_park Comments (1)

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