A Travellerspoint blog

Where's Paula

Better Log Something Before I Forget


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

Out of sight, Out of mind
has been a character trait most of my life. Now, it is really pronounced because of my lack of retention strength!
I have not been keeping up on my travel blog. I had better get in gear or by October I won't have a handy reference when I try to reminisce about my summer on Vancouver Island.
Sheringham Point Lighthouse

Sheringham Point Lighthouse


My lack of documentation doesn't mean that nothing goes on in my life here in Wild and Wonderful British Columbia:
Don't Forget the Library

Don't Forget the Library


Daily:
Read the online papers for almost 2 hours (wish I could stop that!)
I don't know how to turn on the TV, so I have to watch James Cordon and Carpool Karaoke on YouTube.
Knit for at least an hour
Water the garden for at least 30 minutes
Sailing in the Longboat

Sailing in the Longboat


Weekly:
Monday AM - Rowing Group
Tuesday and Wednesday PM - Knitting Circle
Thursday AM - Walking Group
Friday AM - Bicycling Group
Visits to Victoria
Fountain in Victoria

Fountain in Victoria


Victoria Harbour-001

Victoria Harbour-001


Whew! with all this activity, no wonder I have not kept up.
I only have six more days here, so I better get to documenting before it all slips away. I feel like I do when I go to see all the Animated and Live Shorts nominated for Oscars and try to remember each of them after I have left the theater.

Posted by pscotterly 19:14 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (1)

Row, Row

Row Your Boat


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

Authentic Replica of Spanish Boat

Authentic Replica of Spanish Boat


I think I have the correct year when I report that in 1592 Juan de Fuca sailed in the strait now named for him and explored the island now named Vancouver Island. In celebration of the bicentennial of Sooke around 25 years ago, high school students built two exact and authentic replicas of the ship-to-shore boats they used to explore the shoreline. The Sooke Classical Boating Society formed to maintain these boats and their tradition. A group of women go rowing in the Sooke Harbour every Monday morning. I was invited to join them
The office of the society is housed in a repurposed tug in Jenkin's Marina.
Office of the Sooke Long Boat Club

Office of the Sooke Long Boat Club


All Aboard the Longboat

All Aboard the Longboat


A Weekly Outing

A Weekly Outing


A Good Time Is Had by All

A Good Time Is Had by All


Folks, rowing in unison with nine others is not as easy as you might think
For One of Us This Is Serious Business

For One of Us This Is Serious Business


I was assured that my performance was not so bad that I would be barred from participating next week. Perhaps that is because they know I only have one more week!
See You Next Week

See You Next Week


By the way, they also have a members who take the boats sailing. They are looking for more members. You can also rent the boats, but I suggest you have someone with long boat experience!
They generally meet for coffee at the Reading Room, but they had an equipment breakdown this morning. Instead we met at the combined laundromat and coffee shop.
Afterwards Coffee at the Laundromat Cafe

Afterwards Coffee at the Laundromat Cafe

Posted by pscotterly 08:23 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (2)

Do You See the Forest?

Do You See the Trees?


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

Another Walk in the Woods

Another Walk in the Woods


I keep forgetting if this area of Vancouver Island is known as the West End (of the South Point) or just part of the South End. Maybe it is Down Island because when you head NW of Duncan you are going Up Island.

Whatever the geographic descriptive term, there are miles and miles and kilometers and kilometers of trees and forests.
Obviously, one of the biggest industries was and is lumber.
All These Trees Are Massive

All These Trees Are Massive


I took another walk in the woods with the Thursday morning walking group this past week.
Another Walk in the Woods-001

Another Walk in the Woods-001


Some of these folks are quite knowledgeable about their neck of the woods and can name every tree, bush, berry, and bird. Although they are very willing to share and I enjoy hearing the information, I have forgotten the names of most by the time we follow the same route back to the cars. Which, by the way, were parked this week at a member's house in the middle of the forest!

I was committed to find my way through the Avatar Grove to view the world's gnarliest tree. I had turned back the previous week as evening approached, the trail steepened, and I had no idea how long the trail was.
Trees with Moss

Trees with Moss


Here's the Boardwalk

Here's the Boardwalk


Often the trail is difficult to discern, but they have done a good job of making this route "wild" with some hewn assistance over the rough spots.
I met some folks coming down the trail.
"I don't know what I am going to see. How will I know when I come to the end of the trail."
"You'll know," they answered.
Sign at the End of the Trail

Sign at the End of the Trail


They were right.
World's Gnarliest Tree

World's Gnarliest Tree


Okay, I saw the world's gnarliest tree. It really is more interesting than shown in this picture. It's one of those you had to be there things.
I had overheard people in a restaurant talking about their objective to see all Vancouver Island's biggest trees. That seemed like a more manageable goal than climbing all Colorado's 14ers.
I saw an evergreen icon on the map for Harris Creek Spruce. That was one of the biggest trees. It was only about 40 more miles northeast on this Vancouver Island Marine Circle Tour. I decided to continue on this winding road with one lane bridges through the forest to see this tree.
Somehow I missed the turn-off to this tree. I did see a sign designating Tree Hill.
As hard as I looked, I couldn't see any difference in this hill from the million of them I had seen in the last week nor the billions of trees I had driven and even walked passed.
I crossed a mountain peak and suddenly saw acres and acres that had been completely logged. It also appeared it had been ravaged by some kind of disease. This was a surprise after the miles of trees I had been seeing.

I arrived in the settlement of Honeymoon Bay and then Lake Cowichan, There was a nice restaurant with a deck overlooking the lake. This was supposed to be The Lakes Weekend, but they had run out of money. The three day festival had lasted only day. I was a dollar short and a day late. Good thing I had a credit card and they had a museum.
Cowichan Lake  Museum

Cowichan Lake Museum


Please Touch

Please Touch


This was typical of the items in the museum, but they did have good print displays of old newspaper articles. One exhibit on the Chinese workers was especially poignant.
I asked at the Visitors' Center what else I should see while I was there. She asked, "Have you seen our lake and river?"
I left the center, looked across the street, and found a spot a bit more interesting to my tastes.
This Is What I'm Talking About

This Is What I'm Talking About

Everyone in town encouraged me to continue on the circle route to get home so I could have the thrill of going "full circle" and driving through Duncan and Victoria.
I decided to return the way I had arrived; the winding road for 75 miles (that's 120 kilometers!) on which I could maintain a speed of about 40 MPH.
(That's about 60 KPH; I remember that by saying 60 is the new 40 and 50 is the new 30.)
I'll be damned if I didn't miss the turn off for that Harris Pine again.
I am not making a return trip.
Although the woods are lovely dark and deep, I really find them a wee bit depressing after a a few hours in the forest. The massive fir trees loom green on either side. The road is merely an asphalt ribbon in front and a bit of blue sky is a thread above. I feel as if my brain has blinders on it.

When Juan de Fuca'a strait slammed fully in front of my windshield, I shouted with joy. I had to talk a walk and sit on a bench just staring at the sky and the horizon. I felt as if a very heavy and damp hooded cloak had been taken off my shoulders.
Ah Yes

Ah Yes


The Blinders Are Removed

The Blinders Are Removed

Posted by pscotterly 19:00 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island va Comments (0)

A Perfect Day

I'm Easy to Please


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

I rode my bicycle around 11 AM to the Sooke Harbour House.
Reminds Me of the Fearington in NC

Reminds Me of the Fearington in NC


What a beautiful place.
A Very Lovely Lodge

A Very Lovely Lodge


What a delicious lunch,
Lunch at the Sooke Harbour

Lunch at the Sooke Harbour


What beautiful gardens.
Beautiful Grounds and Gardens

Beautiful Grounds and Gardens


What beautiful views.
USA on the Horizon

USA on the Horizon


Driftwood Arbor

Driftwood Arbor


Driftwood Sculpture

Driftwood Sculpture


The Inn sits right at the beginning of the Whiffen Spit, which provides a nice path to walk and benches to view Sooke Harbour and look out to the Juan de Fuca Strait.
Nice Spot to Read a Book

Nice Spot to Read a Book


By the time 5:30 rolled around, I found another spot. Certainly wasn't hungry, but it was Game 7 of the NBA Finals! The TV at my house is not getting a signal. I don't mind not seeing TV for 30 days, but I really needed to see this game! Down the street from my house, the Route 14 Bistro looked like it might have the game on TV.
Not Much from the Outside

Not Much from the Outside


Too bad I had had such a wonderful lunch because, surprisingly, this place also served some very fine food.
Front Row Seat to Game 7

Front Row Seat to Game 7


The Cavalier win was the frosting on the cake for this day. I sure didn't need to order a dessert!
Hip, Hip Hooray, Cavs!!

Posted by pscotterly 20:33 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (0)

WWKIP Day

Oh, The Excitement


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

In case you missed it, Saturday June 18 was World Wide Knit in Public Day!
WWKIP Day

WWKIP Day


I joined the KIP session at Seaside Yarn and Button in Sooke.
Buy, Buy, Buy

Buy, Buy, Buy


Along with about 50 other white, mostly middle-aged women and a small number of boys and girls, we sat on the front porch to knit, enjoy looking at everyone's projects, eat cake, and add to our personal stash of quality yarns.
All the hubbub of activity made it necessary for Mr.Sarah (I don't know the surname of the owner) to literally man the register.

After a strenuous four hours of knitting, I found myself back at Mama's for some more of her salmon chowder and lemon meringue pie. I ate the last breadbowl ever to be served at Mama's; they have taken it off the menu.
Mamas's Last Breadbowl

Mamas's Last Breadbowl


Just As Pretty Not As Good

Just As Pretty Not As Good

I didn't need an official day to knit in public. As a matter of fact, I have been doing this for decades. Much to the chagrin of my offspring, I have been known to knit at school sporting events and jazz choir concerts.
One day last week, I sat on a bench in the park on Victoria Harbour knitting and enjoying the view and passing pedestrians.
Victoria Harbour

Victoria Harbour


Two couples greeted me as they passed. One of the men called out "Saturday is World Wide Knit in Public Day!"
What a hoot!
"How did you know that?" I asked.
"I knit," his wife replied.

So now all of you are in the know. Watch for it next year wherever you may be on the second Saturday in June.

Posted by pscotterly 09:34 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (1)

Working in the Salt Mine

A Continent Apart


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

Four or five years, before Ol '95 entered my life, I rented a car and took a two-week road trip in southeast Canada. I took an overnight ferry to the Iles de Madeleine (in English the Magdalen Islands). I didn't keep a journey blog then and I seem to have lost all the pictures on old computer crashes.
There on that island while riding a rented scooter in the rain, I "discovered" a salt mine!
Now on another Canadian island an entire continent to the West, I discovered another salt production facility!
Saltwest Harvestry

Saltwest Harvestry


The salt mine on the Iles de Madeleine is one of the biggest producers of ice melt salt from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes. The mine is hundreds of feet underground beneath the island and the Atlantic. It has been mined for decades. It is so huge that dozens of dump trucks, huge earth scrapers and other equipment are used in the mining process. The salt is loaded on barges and ships just as grain would be and shipped to other ports.

I have searched online and can't find any pictures or links to this mine. Perhaps there is one in French because the Isles de Madeleine are part of the province of Quebec and most people do not speak English. I even had a private tour by the one person who spoke English. (By the way, for safety reasons visitors are not allowed in the mine,)

I was amazed. Although I have always heard about working in the salt mine, I had no idea.
The Big Facility

The Big Facility


Who would guess that here on Vancouver Island on the other side of Canada, I would find one of the smallest salt producers in the world!
Meet Saltwest in Otter Point on Vancouver Island.
New Kettles and Bottling System Ready to Go

New Kettles and Bottling System Ready to Go


Here the production is all by hand one boiled pot at a time
Eight Hours in the Sun

Eight Hours in the Sun


or even more slowly, one solar-dried tray at a time! All from salt water taken from the Salish Sea right here in old Juan de Fuca's strait.

Little did Jessica know when she decided to start this business that this Salish See water had the lowest salinity content in the Pacific.
Undaunted, she has grown her business from boiling a pot on a butane flame to just installing new-fangled electric steam kettles.
Her husband Jeff was able to quit his job as a plumber and put a lot of that knowledge to work. They now desalinate the water to produce the salt. Health inspectors have told her the water is so pure she should bottle it instead of using it to water the garden. Watch for Salish Pure on her web site.
A Fine Selection of Gourmet and Bath Salts

A Fine Selection of Gourmet and Bath Salts


While you are at it, buy a few bags of the gourmet herb-flavored salt and know that her mother volunteered two days a week baking it in the oven.
Garlic Flavored Salt Waiting for Oven Time

Garlic Flavored Salt Waiting for Oven Time

Posted by pscotterly 23:16 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (0)

Walk on the Wild Side

Well, It's Not Really So Wild


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

Hey, Babe, Take a Walk on the Wild Side.
This Isn't the City, Toto

This Isn't the City, Toto


Well, it is not a true Wild Side, but this was the earworm I had during most of this walk.
And when that wasn't in my left ear, The Happy Wanderer was in my right!
Beaches Are As Wild As the Woods

Beaches Are As Wild As the Woods


Here in the "east end," as I think this part of Vancouver Island is called, is a rain forest.
I drove through about 50 miles of it from Sooke to Port Renfrew and the Botanical Beach Provincial Park.
By the way, the reason I started thinking the island was about twice big as I thought is because all the distances I was looking at were now in kilometers. Silly me! Now, every number I see posted, including the speed limit, I mentally multiply by .6.

This part of the island receives about 136" of precipitation a year. In contrast, Dener receives less than 18 inches a year.

There is a mist hanging over Juan de Fuca's strait, clouds rest on the mountaintops, and a breeze blows - at least today it is only a breeze. By noon, the sun shines with enough heat to make you shed a layer or two only to put them back on again around 4 PM.
Path through the Rain Forest

Path through the Rain Forest


Shale and Quartz

Shale and Quartz


Leaves and Lichen

Leaves and Lichen


Botanical Beach is known for two features:

The last 2.5 kilometers of this trail is a loop that leads from the parking lot to the beach.
After a walk through the forest, you can walk out on the beach to look at the tide pools.
Not As Easy As the Trail

Not As Easy As the Trail

Definitely, check the tide charts and make this walk at low tide. You would see none of this at high tide.
Crawl Among the Rocks to See Tide Pools

Crawl Among the Rocks to See Tide Pools


Looking into a Tide Pool

Looking into a Tide Pool


Looking into Tidepool 2

Looking into Tidepool 2


Looking into Tidepool 3

Looking into Tidepool 3


Looking into Tidepool ##?

Looking into Tidepool ##?


One More Look

One More Look


A Great Place for Lunch

A Great Place for Lunch


There are a few restaurants in Port Renfrew. I chose the Renfrew Pub on Snuggery Cove as did several people who had spent the last 5 days walking the rugged Marine Trail.
At the End of the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail

At the End of the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail


After lunch, I headed up through the lands of the Pacheedaht First Nation to the Avatar Grove.
On to the Avatar Grove

On to the Avatar Grove


Path to the Avatar Grove 1

Path to the Avatar Grove 1


Path to the Avatar Grove 2

Path to the Avatar Grove 2

Path to the Avatar Grove 3

Path to the Avatar Grove 3


Just past this spot on the trail, I saw a couple coming down the trail. They said no one remained at the grove and I was only about halfway.
I continued on for a few paces and then either intelligence or old age set in. It was after 5 PM, I am arthritic, fat, and almost 72. It was probably not a good idea for me to continue as there was no one in the world who knew where I was or would even think I was missing until sometime in July.
I decided to return to my pleasant home in Sooke and take this jaunt another day.
Here, the wildlife munched in my neighborhood
Deer in the Churchyard

Deer in the Churchyard


Scrawny Shedding Deer

Scrawny Shedding Deer


The next day, I met up with a hiking group that meets every Thursday for a mild hike. They have 52 walks they like and take a different one every week. Apparently, they have maintained this routine for several circuits.

This Thursday, we circled the Esquimalt Lagoon and part of the Royal Roads University campus which was formerly a military college which one of the members of the hiking group had attended.
It was nice to walk with other people who notice so much along the way, are familiar with the environment, and so congenial to a stranger.
At the Lagoon with the Hiking Group

At the Lagoon with the Hiking Group


Across the Lagoon

Across the Lagoon


Mother and Twins

Mother and Twins


Near the Heron Rookery

Near the Heron Rookery


We stopped for a nice lunch after the walk.
I want to join them again next Thursday. As I dropped my Kindle in the back seat of the vehicle in which I carpooled, I know I will.

Posted by pscotterly 13:03 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (2)

Stop Whining

Start Living


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

I travel the way I do because I like to pretend I live in the place where I am instead of just being a tourist. So after 24 hours, it's time for me to start pretending.
Actually, I have a very fine home to be living in.
Entry

Entry


Very Comfortable and Attractive Home

Very Comfortable and Attractive Home


One Half of Backyard

One Half of Backyard


I am charged with keeping the hundreds of plants alive and healthy! I think I am better skilled at picking up dog poop!
I am living in Sooke for a month, so I had better get out and discover it. Glad to have my bicycle so I can see things slowly and up close. Rolling Streets of Sooke

Rolling Streets of Sooke


Vancouver Island is NOT flat; at least here on the South coast. It is good exercise and I am proud of myself that I have ridden my bike undaunted.
I was glad, however, when when Mr. Danny Heggelund stopped me from riding my bike down the hill to the boardwalk and told me to park it at his house.
Park Your Bike Here

Park Your Bike Here


I'm Glad I Was Warned

I'm Glad I Was Warned


It is really much steeper than it appears here!
I have included a link to the obituary of Danny Heggelund's mother. Reading it gives you a real feel for the history of standing on this spot.
The boardwalk has steep stairs leading down to Sooke Harbour and then a half mile or so along the beach.Boardwalk Along Sooke Harbour

Boardwalk Along Sooke Harbour


Then, the boardwalk zigzags up the hill through the forest.
Boardwalk through the Forest

Boardwalk through the Forest


Floor of the Rain Forest

Floor of the Rain Forest


Stately Stands

Stately Stands


Interesting Tree Growth

Interesting Tree Growth


Boardwalk Arbor

Boardwalk Arbor


This will be a nice little walk to take frequently.
At one time, there was a lot of money and grand homes in Sooke. Not sure where they are now. Not much of the lumber, fishing, and rum runner history remains.
These Columns Only Historic Remains

These Columns Only Historic Remains


The city or someone has provided an interesting touch on all the power boxes (or whatever these things are all over town!) by covering them with historic photographed scenes.
Photos of Sooke's History

Photos of Sooke's History


Most of the homes appear to be like those in my neighborhood.
Unusual and Highend Homes Along the Bay

Unusual and Highend Homes Along the Bay


Mr. Heggelund's (built on the site of the home described in the obituary) was quite new and stately, but I didn't get a good picture of it.
The city and some businesses appear to be doing quite a bit of landscaping.
Anglican Church Yard

Anglican Church Yard

Some Businesses Add an Attractive Touch

Some Businesses Add an Attractive Touch


There are several restaurants. I ate at Mom's Cafe.
The salmon chowder is excellent and the pie is worth driving all the way from Colorado to have a slice.
Best Pies in North America

Best Pies in North America


There are a couple of good grocery stores, health food store, BC liquor store, and drug store just two hills from my house. The "boutique center" is near Mom's. I visited only one spot to save something for another day.
Boutique Block

Boutique Block


Fortunately, I also found the bus to Victoria that has frequent runs during normal commuting hours. I think many folks either work in Victoria or are retirees. I saw a lot of people who looked like me all over town.
How to Get to Victoria

How to Get to Victoria


I visited the regional museum, which would probably be of great interest only to me and the only other visitors - a grandmother with her approximately 6-year-old granddaughter.
Regional Museum

Regional Museum


745 - 1976

745 - 1976


One of the exhibits is this slice of a tree harvested in 1976 that began growing over 1200 years ago. Lumber is still a big business here. Apparently, they used these old growth firs for pilings and railroad trestles.
The visitor center is very useful and one of the workers very knowledgeable. The others not so up to snuff. Didn't know anything about the area and wasn't surprised when my purchase of 6 postcards at 3 for !.25 totaled $16.74. She said "This is the price after tax."
After getting that settled, I have enough gas money and information to head along the coast tomorrow and discover new terrain.

Posted by pscotterly 09:22 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (1)

North to Vancouver Island

Arriving in Canada


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

See You Later, USA

See You Later, USA


Looking Back

Looking Back


I have longed to visit Vancouver Island for many years. I don't know why; it just seemed like a wonderful place to visit.
I like the idea of accessing someplace only by boat or air.
Ferrying Across de Fuca

Ferrying Across de Fuca


I perused travel guides on the 90 minute ferry ride. Perhaps I should have done a bit more research before I started out. I like to be surprised when I arrive someplace. Well, I guess I will be.
I finally discovered that Vancouver Island is almost twice the size I thought it was.
Perhaps there aren't as many First Nations cultural centers to visit.
Perhaps the villages are not as quaint as on Nantucket as I had imagined they would be.
Victoria is supposed to be the most delightful city in Canada. I can hardly wait to spend idle hours in the city streets. That would wait for another day because I had an appointment in Sooke.
Here Comes Victoria

Here Comes Victoria


While waiting in line for customs, I realized my phone did not work in Canada. Before leaving, I made contact with Verizon about my trip and set up an access plan. Hmmmm. Guess it didn't go through.
I didn't have any Google Maps to tell me how to get to the address in Sooke. I couldn't call my contact to tell har I had arrived and to meet me.
I began to have an uneasy feeling.

By the way, customs is truly a grilling process now. I was asked every kind of question about where I was staying, why, how I made contact with the people I was house sitting for, what were there exact addresses. When I told them I would be returning to the US for one week, they wanted to know where my new granddaughter lived and where she was born!
For crying out loud! I am one old lady visiting Vancouver Island. How many jobs can I steal from the locals?
If they were so worried about me, they should have checked the van for explosives or ingredients for homemade bombs. If they would hae searched it, they would have found the six bottles of wine and jug of vodka I lied about bringing into the country!

I struggled the van through Victoria traffic until I could find a parking place.
"Think, Paula! How did you get around and make phone calls before we used cell phones? Surely, I could get from Victoria to Sooke. But how?
Somehow, I had found my way in Kazakhstan and 7 other countries in Europe without a cell phone.
Fortunately, I remembered gas stations! Even though they didn't have a pay phone or maps. They did allow me to use their phone. They even dialed it for me because I couldn't remember how to dial a landline phone.
Even more fortunate, Vancouver Island has only one highway. Follow it until you see a sign to turn off for Sooke.

There was also a bad accident on the two-lane, mountainside route 14 which caused traffic to be delayed for at least 30 minutes.
Along the way, although there was some nice scenery periodically, the area looked like any suburb anywhere - just a few more hills and trees.
When I finally drove the 20 miles into Sooke, it didn't look quite like I expected.
Where's the Quaint Fishing Village

Where's the Quaint Fishing Village


When I turned down the street to my assignment, I realized I sure wasn't staying in a little fishing village neighborhood.
Things Aren't Looking Any Quainter

Things Aren't Looking Any Quainter


OMG Another Cul de Sac

OMG Another Cul de Sac


At first, I couldn't find the addresses on the one-block-long cul de sac. I parked the van and walked looking for it. Still could not see it, so I asked a woman watering her lawn if whe knew which house was 6704.
"I have absolutely no idea," she replied and turned her back.
Soon, I discovered it was two doors from where she stood.

Welcome to Sooke.
I sure had expected something different.

Posted by pscotterly 10:05 Archived in Canada Tagged vancouver_island Comments (0)

Going West As Far As I Can Go

Heading North


View North by Northwest on pscotterly's travel map.

One final walk of my three canine companions early Sunday morning and then on the highway before 9 AM.

Gosh it was good to get on the road again, I needed to see something besides those cul de sacs I had been walking for 45 minutes twice a day, I have to admit that for two weeks, I kept thinking there were many streets and I kept getting lost and confused. Finally, I realized there were really only two circles and three dead ends. I had been walking in circles the entire time,
Odd that I can get all around the US in this old van and travel Europe via train and bus, but get lost in a white bread suburb!

I drove on the Interstates from Portland until I reached Highway 12 in Washington. I then followed 12 to Washington 101 and 112 into Port Angeles.
Perhaps you can see the route on this map.

Much of the roadside view is blocked by towering trees. Supposedly, the forest we drove through in Idaho is one of the largest in the lower 48. You wouldn't think it compares with what you drive through in Washington and the Olympic National Forest.
Lake Quinault

Lake Quinault


Quinalt is a beautiful lake and community within the National Forest and next to the southwest tip of Olympic National Park. There is a historic lodge, but if you are toying with something more permanent this has to be the lowest pricing for lake property I have seen in all my travels.
Only 129000

Only 129000


Every now and then you catch a glimpse of towering peaks in your rear view mirror. Then all of a sudden - there is the Pacific right in front of you.
The Pacific at Kalaloch

The Pacific at Kalaloch


Stop at Kalaloch for the view, the food, or to stay a while.
A Perfect Retreat

A Perfect Retreat


Here is a direct suggestion to my friend Cheryl:
Gather up some of your quilting friends and stay here for an extended weekend of quilting and touring.
While there, take a day trip up to the Makah Indian Reservation to visit the Makah Cultural Center.
Worth a Visit

Worth a Visit


I journeyed to Neah Bay because it is the furthest western point in the northwestern USA.
[Neah Bay Is Still a Fishing Port

Neah Bay Is Still a Fishing Port


Any road you venture down will be a treat. Click on this link to hear the birds, but you will just have to imagine the fragrence on your own.
Wish I Could Still Hear and Smell It

Wish I Could Still Hear and Smell It


After going as far west as I could go, I headed east and found a place to camp on the beach near where Sand Creek empties into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. I had to check Wikipedia to learn about ol' Juan.
Strait of Juan de Fuca

Strait of Juan de Fuca


It is not the most beautiful campsite
You Stay for the Beach View

You Stay for the Beach View


Morning at Sand Beach Campground

Morning at Sand Beach Campground


Or the Mountain View

Or the Mountain View


In the morning, I took a stroll on the beach which looks like mud. When you touch it, however, it is very fine sand. Also, parts of it swarmed with these little critters that tried to get out of your way; would disappear; and then reappear. There wasn't anyone up to ask what they were and I forgot about it by the time others in the campground started stirring.
Half Shrimp Half Cricket

Half Shrimp Half Cricket


Crabs in the Port

Crabs in the Port


I headed to Port Angeles for a breakfast of local Dungenese Crab Benedict.
Here Comes the Ferry

Here Comes the Ferry


By noon, it was time to ride the ferry to Vancouver Island where I will spend the next two months.

Posted by pscotterly 17:43 Archived in USA Tagged washington Comments (1)

(Entries 41 - 50 of 66) « Page 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 »