A Travellerspoint blog

Denver or Portland?

Which Is the Best?

Denver and Portland are similar in size of population and Denver is only 10 square miles larger. Portland is the only other city I have visited that I think I could consider living in. I keep weighing the pros and cons in my mind. Here is a little of what I keep tossing back and forth.

Denver has 300 days of Sunshine. Portland has 65.

Denver's dry climate causes your skin to crack and your nails to break. In Portland you will have fewer wrinkles.

Both are bicycle friendly, but Denver cyclers are more self righteous and refuse to practice safe riding habits.

Both have fine museums; Denver has more and they are larger with better exhibits and permanent collections.

Denver has more live theaters and performing arts.

The farmers' markets in Portland are truly Farmer's Markets and not unpackaged grocery produce like you often find in Denver

Both have good public transportation. The people in the Portland area actually use it. The Portland light rail extends to the suburbs and you can ride anywhere in the area all day on any train, bus, or trolley for only $2.50 if you are an "Honored Citizen,"

It is a good thing there is good public transportation because driving in Portland is a nightmare; it is at the intersection of two major rivers with 10 bridges. Streets and highways curve around hills and go through tunnels. Denver is laid out in a grid (except the downtown area) with all streets either in alphabetical or numerical order on the nice, slightly sloping plains.

The homeless population in Denver appears to be greater in number with more panhandling. I have never seen violence by homeless on non-homeless/transient in Denver or serious drug-tripping in the middle of Denver streets, but I have seen it daily in Portland.

Downtown Portland has true shopping and department stores. There is even a Target in a historic 3-story building! Heart-of-Denver stores are mainly for tourists or noon-hour shopping.

Grandson Bazil lives in Denver; Bazil does not live in Portland. That makes the decision. I stay in Denver until he is grown or moves away.

Posted by pscotterly 16:42 Archived in USA Tagged denver portland Comments (1)

If You Were Wondering About Me

I've Been in Hillsboro

Saturday Night in Hillsboro

Saturday Night in Hillsboro


This is about as wild as my life has been here in the suburb of Hillsboro, Oregon.
I take that back. I did ride my bike to the wonderful Hillsboro Public Library.
Hillsboro Library

Hillsboro Library


From a window on the second floor of the library, I saw little children peering inside a tree trunk. I knew I had to check it out.
Duck's Nest in Tree Trunk

Duck's Nest in Tree Trunk


Mama-to-be was very tolerant of the inquisitive. I don't think it was the first time she had hatched in this spot. I was delighted to share my "discovery" with other mothers and children.
And, of course, I practiced my Find a Grave hobby by visiting the Fir Lawn and Multnomah cemeteries.

But Hey, Girls just want to have fun!
Fortunately, Bert and Diane, my friends of 46 years from Denver, were also visiting in Portland. We met for dinner at the Veritable Quandary, which I highly recommend for both eating and drinking. But you'd better hurry! When I searched for a link for this entry, I just learned they are closing at the end of this summer!.
Bert and Diane in Portland

Bert and Diane in Portland


Forever in a Veritable Quandary

Forever in a Veritable Quandary


My friend Cheryl lives just up the road from me near the historic Orenco Park Station. Not much is left of historical interest in the area, so we visited the Washington County History Museum.
The Viewfinder Is from Washington County

The Viewfinder Is from Washington County


Even the staff was amazed that we kept ourselves entertained among the exhibits for several hours. You will find the museum above the Starbucks in downtown Hillsboro.
Studying the 1938 Quilt

Studying the 1938 Quilt


We Mastered Only the Candlestick

We Mastered Only the Candlestick

Cheryl Solved the Magnet Puzzle

Cheryl Solved the Magnet Puzzle


If you go on Saturday, you can also go to the Farmer's Market. If you want so-so but huge burritos, eat lunch at Amelia's. If you want better American food and smiling service, go to the Reedville Cafe.

I have enjoyed my canine companionship, meeting up with my old friend Cheryl, and the close proximity to Portland. However, I am ready to get on the road again on Saturday morning and head north.

Posted by pscotterly 14:26 Archived in USA Tagged oregon Comments (0)

If You Liked the Rose Garden

You Will LOVE the Chinese Garden

overcast

I think the Lin Su traditional Chinese Garden is one of the most beautiful places I have seen in all my travels.
Chinese Garden

Chinese Garden


For some reason, I missed it the last time I was in Portland. If you come to the area, do not miss this spot.
Chinese Garden 2

Chinese Garden 2


There is something for every type of tourist:
Suzhoa Style Sweeping Roof

Suzhoa Style Sweeping Roof


Walking tour on your own with a pamphlet
Notebook of every plant for your own walking tour
Docent-led tours
Lectures
Videos
Teahouse
Musicians
Calligraphy Demonstrations
Ancient and Modern

Ancient and Modern


Everything is so beautifully presented, that nothing interferes with the serenity and beauty of the place. I came on a cool and rainy Thursday, however, so you might find more crowds on a summer weekend.
After the Rain

After the Rain


The docent who led our tour was almost overwhelming in all the information she had on the symbolism of each tree, plant, and architectural feature. She also shared information on the lifestyle of the type of person who would have had such a garden. I am sure that after the cultural revolution, even fewer people have private classical Chinese Gardens

Through the Lotus Window

Through the Lotus Window


The Tao of Tea

The Tao of Tea


I also had a respite in the teahouse, which made me wonder why I don't drink tea more often.
Tea and Bean Paste Cookies

Tea and Bean Paste Cookies

Altar in Teahouse

Altar in Teahouse


Through the Teahouse Window

Through the Teahouse Window


I attended a lecture on the Chinese-American history in Oregon. To my surprise, the lecturer talked about the dedication of the park in Astoria, Oregon. If you rode with me in 2014, you might recall my visit there and how profoundly it impacted me. She was delighted when I shared this information as she had been on the dais at the dedication. Click this link if you want to go down memory road with me.

Grotto

Grotto


Year of the Monkey

Year of the Monkey


Vase with Chrysantheums

Vase with Chrysantheums


Unfortunately through some mishap, I deleted over half of the pictures I took when I uploaded them to Picasa from my camera. I had few to choose from and what I did save are not the best.
I particularly regret deleting the photos of the man who created the caricature calligraphy of Bazil's name.
Charicture Calligraphy

Charicture Calligraphy

Posted by pscotterly 16:48 Archived in USA Tagged oregon Comments (0)

Take Time to Smell the Roses

City of Roses

sunny

In a Garden

In a Garden


(My father always used almost that exact quote to describe a walk in the woods.)
I always thought that beecause of the International Test Garden, Portland was known as the City of Roses. After reading the previous link, however, I find that there are many other reasons Portland has this nickname.
Rose Garden 1

Rose Garden 1


Yes, the Rose Garden certainly has the greatest variety and covers the most acreage in the city, but almost every private yard has at least one rose bush. Must be the climate.
Rose Garden 3

Rose Garden 3


It was September when I visited two years ago. May is certainly a better time to see the blooms.
Of Course, I Like the Sculpture

Of Course, I Like the Sculpture

More Than Roses

More Than Roses


My Favorite

My Favorite


The last time I visited, I took the Hop On/Off bus to get to the garden. If you are staying in Portland, take the public bus or the Hop On/Off tour. As I am staying about 12 miles away from the city, this time I drove. Be advised: parking is at a minimum in Washington Park.
Overlooks Portland

Overlooks Portland


The park also covers some very steep terrain. I found a parking spot at the bottom of the hill and unloaded my bike to ride up to the garden. I am embarrassed to admit I had to dismount and walk my bike up the hill. It was fun riding back down to Ol' '95, however!
Rose Garden 5

Rose Garden 5


Everyone Photoed This One

Everyone Photoed This One

Posted by pscotterly 08:56 Archived in USA Tagged oregon Comments (0)

Suburban Life

A Change of Scenery

Dominique and I traveled in Ol' '95 for 1922 miles experiencing some pretty wild weather through the backcountry of six states: Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Now, Ol' '95 is getting a much need rest in the 'burbs.
Ol' '95 Living on a Suburban Street

Ol' '95 Living on a Suburban Street


Suburban Development

Suburban Development


Now, I find myself living in suburban Hillsboro.

There ain't nothing wrong with it; but it is different from where I have been and even from anyplace I have ever lived.
Oh no, I stand corrected; it is very similar to Matthews, North Carolina. I did, however, have to leave Matthews because I longed to see panhandlers on the corner, dumpster pickers in the alleys, and small shops on the streets.

Here in Hillsboro, my living with Aang, Toph, and Steve is fairly relaxed.
AM in the House

AM in the House


A Change of Position

A Change of Position


We take a couple walks each day. The first day, I had trouble finding my way home. I couldn't remember the address and all the houses looked similar, the streets ended in cul de sacs or wound in circles.
My Corner in the Suburbs

My Corner in the Suburbs


I took a picture of the intersection to remind myself, but then did not bring either my camera or phone!
You Can Do It Steve

You Can Do It Steve


Steve is a 12-yer-old greyhound rescue - as a matter of fact, he was a reject because he wouldn't stay on the track. I have had to shorten his walks. Because of his arthritis, he can't make it up the steps on our return. I know how he feels; as much as I have deteriorated in two years, I shudder to think what my legs and hips will be like in two more years!

Everything is very attractive, neat, and quiet.
Dogtrot through the Backyard

Dogtrot through the Backyard


Except when the neighbor dog Ruby comes over to play. There is an open gate with a path worn in the grass from all the dog trotting back and forth. I am not sure they like Grandma very much because I make them play outside instead of in my house. Ruby goes home as soon as I put them outdoors.

With the help of Google Maps and my bicycle, I have found some nice shops at Orenco Station and the metro station less than two miles from my house. There is also a mall and perhaps even a movie theater within biking distance.
Found  A Bit of Nearby Shopping

Found A Bit of Nearby Shopping


Can Only Mean One Thing

Can Only Mean One Thing


A sign with a black sheep caught my eye - Of Course! a yarn shop. Perhaps I will take a class or just go for the drop-in gatherings.
It doesn't sound like a wild life. I am enjoying just hanging out and not being on the road.

I will be here until June 3, so I plan on getting out and about a bit more to show you some of the sights of Portland and Hillsboro.

Posted by pscotterly 17:51 Archived in USA Tagged oregon Comments (1)

Au Revoir Dominique

Hello Steve, Aang, Toph

Revoir  mon ami

Revoir mon ami


It is time to say "so long" (that is American slang for Goodbye, French readers) and say "Howdy" (French readers, that's western American slang for Hello) to my new companions.
Aang, Steve, Toph

Aang, Steve, Toph

I will be pet sitting for the next two+ weeks for three dogs in Hillsboro, Oregon.

Posted by pscotterly 05:52 Archived in USA Tagged washington Comments (1)

Day Nine - On the Road with Dominique

Oregon to Washington and Back to Oregon

Hosts and Guests at the R and R Guest House

Hosts and Guests at the R and R Guest House


We left the R and R Guest House at noon for a day of touring that would end up in Portland, Oregon.
Oddly enough, we saw buildings based on Swedish log structures, a French-style chateau, and a replica of the Stonehenge in England.
Dominique's First Senior Discount

Dominique's First Senior Discount


First stop was a visit to the surgeon's house in historic fort in The Dalles, Oregon.
Surgeon's Home

Surgeon's Home


Trapper and Soldier

Trapper and Soldier


Houses Bankrupted the Fort

Houses Bankrupted the Fort


The commanding general at this fort spent so much money building fine homes for the officers that it bankrupted the fort. In 1905, all the homes had burned or fallen into disrepair, Some ladies of the town rallied together to save the surgeon's home and it was gradually restored to stand as the fine museum of today.
Andersen Homestead

Andersen Homestead


Part of this park includes structures moved - piece by piece or board by board - from a Swedish settlement outside of town.

After a brief bit of hysteria when the bank would not accept Dominique's ATM card, we traveled north across the Columbia River into Washington.
First Crossing of the Columbia

First Crossing of the Columbia


Here, we visited Stonehenge, which was built by Sam Hill as a memorial to area soldiers who lost their lives in World War I.
Columbia River Bridge Seen through Stonehenge

Columbia River Bridge Seen through Stonehenge


Windmills Seen through Stonehenge

Windmills Seen through Stonehenge


Memorial for All Other Wars

Memorial for All Other Wars

Next on the road West is Maryhill Museum. Originally, Sam Hill built this as a home where he envisioned a settlement of Quaker farmers. The land proved too arid for farming and no Quakers arrived or at least stayed. The home was abandoned before it was finished.
Eventually, Hill decided to turn it into a museum for his and others' collections.
Maryhill Museum

Maryhill Museum


It is quite worth the visit to see everything from Rodin studies to post-WWII couture samples to Native American art - all on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River gorge.
Sam Hill was an enterprising and interesting man. The museum was dedicated by the Queen of Romania (granddaughter of Queen Victoria), who was a friend of Hill because of the bond money he raised for Romania after the war.
Dominique's French guidebook claims that is from his name Americans get the expression "What the Sam Hill!" I asked about this at the museum, but they deny that and claim the expression was used instead of cursing before this Sam Hill's time.

Continue West to stop at one or several wineries. As wineries are no big deal to Dominique and I don't taste and drive, we passed these looking for the wild animal park we had been told was on this stretch of road. We never found it. Maybe that was because it is in Winston on the Oregon side of the river.

We then crossed the Columbia River again on the historic $1 iron toll bridge to return to Hood River, Oregon. We exited the the Interstate to drive along historic Oregon highway 30 to view some of the waterfalls.
It began to rain. We could see the Horsetail Falls from the car.
Although you can see Multnomah Falls from the road, everyone really likes to climb the stairs to view it midway.
Remember Spiro Agnew who said, "You've seen one slum, you've seen them all."? Afraid that is the attitude I have taken on waterfalls. Not to doubt their beauty, but I had climbed these stairs in the past. I thought I could miss the trek in the rain and encouraged Dominique to go ahead on her own.

While waiting in the van, I began to get concerned about where we would spend the night. It was raining and getting dark. We wanted to stay near the airport tonight. I started calling hotels. None was available that I felt would be within Dominique's price range. After 5 calls and 5 waits on hold, I finally found a Hampden Inn for only $116 because of my Hilton Rewards. I grabbed two rooms. (we must have two rooms or have me sleep in the van because of my snoring! Remember that if you ever travel with me.)

When Dominique returned to the van, I asked her about the falls. She replied, "Like you say, it is a waterfall!"
I am glad she had taken that attitude because there are about 13 more on this stretch of road and I had stopped at every one of them 2 1/2 years ago while taking a bicycle tour!

It was then I described to Dominique the accommodations I had been lucky enough to find near the airport.
Then she had a reaction.
Then we both had a meltdown.
After our meltdowns, we decided we had probably spent 14 days misinterpreting accents and comments. What I had taken as criticizing and complaints about all the accommodations and restaurants, Dominique assured me had been comments of surprise. Unless I had been able to locate rooms through the travel clubs or with friends and free or grocery meals, I felt like she was upset. Quite frankly, this got me a bit upset!

Fortunately, we agreed it was just the difference in our accents and her use of direct English sentences.

We made it to the Portland airport through the rain in spite of my erratic windshield wipers.
Dominique had her first and only American Hamburger and "French fries."
Hamburger and Fries

Hamburger and Fries


We went to our $132 (with tax) rooms on our last night of this road trip as very good international friends.
The Last American Hotel

The Last American Hotel

Posted by pscotterly 12:55 Archived in USA Tagged washington_oregon Comments (1)

Day Eight - On the Road with Dominique

Corners of Idaho Washington Oregon

sunny

After bidding Lloyd and the mountainside of Kamiah a fond au revoir, we continued west on US 12 to the Nez Perce Historical Park.
Nez Perce NHP

Nez Perce NHP


Actually, the park contains several sites throughout the Nez Perce reservation. If so inclined, you can stop at several or all of them. There is also a back-country gravel road that follows their Trail of Tears when they lost their last battle.
As you travel through the Nez Perce reservation, you might wonder (as did I) why there are so many European (read white) settlements and homes here. I asked several people who did not have an answer. On line, I learned that the government opened up this reservation for settlement just as they had Oklahoma. One Anglo proudly told me that at least one town is at least 50% Nez Perce today. The main benefit that I can see to this Anglo population is the commerce and industry readily available for employment. Perhaps that is actually because this is truly an Eden and not as harsh as the badlands of the Dakotas. That (and the minerals) is probably also why the government opened this land for settlement!
Green Country

Green Country


I am not sure what happened, but I don't seem to find any photos of the drive from the Nez Perce park on Friday afternoon until Saturday morning!
I remember some beautiful scenery.
I remember stopping in Walla Walla, Washington for lunch at La cocina de la Abuela.
I remember traveling beside and crossing the Columbia River.
I remember marveling at the green hills of wheat and grass.
I remember seeing our first vineyards.
It is a good thing I remember it because I don't have any pictures of it.
You will also have to drive this route if you want to see what it looks like!

By 6 PM, we found our way to the R and R Guest House in The Dalles, Oregon. While we were staying in Stevensville, Steve located this spot on the internet while I was pondering where to spend Friday night. It was a good find!
When I drove through the neighborhood following Google directions, I was getting rather disappointed. The house is in the middle of blocks of 1950s bungalows and turn-of-the-century mine housing. Although neat, it didn't seem like B and B territory. Once you enter the Guest House and meet Kevin and Julie the hosts, you will be delighted you chose this place. Even Dominique thought it might be worth the money spent. (Actually, I asked for a $125 rate and thought we had an excellent deal. However, the neighborhood would probably make it really worth less,)
Dominique even took a walking video because of the fine details and amenities provided by the hosts. Even I, who loves to locate nice inns and spend the lodging bucks, was pleased with how freely the wine flowed, the nice pool and hot tub, and the comfortable rooms. The bathroom setup is a big strange, however. I had to take my morning shower off the kitchen while the hosts prepared breakfast.

Posted by pscotterly 10:54 Archived in USA Tagged idaho washington_oregon Comments (0)

Day Seven - On the Road with Dominique

We're Gonna Go through Idaho

We stopped at the wonderful market in the little town of Stevensville to load up our picnic cooler and also purchase dinner to share with our Affordable Travel Club host that night.
Highway 12 West out of Montana and across Idaho is Lewis and Clark country. Stop at the Traveler's Rest on the east side of Lolo Pass. At this time, it is the only site where it is unequivocally proven as a L&C campground. Mercury was used as a treatment for many ailments at the time. Mercury traces were found in the privy spot at this campground as it was described in their journals. They also reported dosing the men with mercury at this site.
On the Trail with Lewis and Clark

On the Trail with Lewis and Clark


As soon as you cross the state line into Idaho,
Welcome to Idaho

Welcome to Idaho


Straddling the State Line

Straddling the State Line


there is a visitor center with even more information about L&C and the original tribes of the area.
A Successful Hunt

A Successful Hunt


You can also have a nice picnic lunch and, if the snow is melted, take a little stroll.
The Never Empty Picnic Bag

The Never Empty Picnic Bag


Dominique Adds a Sticker

Dominique Adds a Sticker


And Another Sticker

And Another Sticker


Highway 12 curves its way along the Lochsa and Selway Rivers.
Although this drive was spectacular, both Dominique and I became a little overwhelmed. The canyon seems never ending with the sides reaching up to the sky filled to the inch with towering pine trees, I learned later that this is the largest area of forest in the United States outside of Alaska.
Finally the Canyon Walls End

Finally the Canyon Walls End


Population Decline

Population Decline


Eventually the canyon opens up to the Middle Fork of the Clearwater River where were spending the night in Kamiah. This is a delightful little town with 2 bars (more churches than bars a woman smoking outside one of the bars reported), a great ACE hardware, a rather nice ladies' boutique. Of course there is the library where you can get free internet and all sorts of friendly assistance.
Kamiah Welcome

Kamiah Welcome


We drove up to the mountainside to stay with Lloyd. His wife had to go to Seattle for annual training related to her nursing profession. Although she is the usual hostess, they decided Lloyd could handle us on his own. We prepared a nice dinner and Lloyd handled setting the table and the clean-up chores.
Another Nice Resting Place

Another Nice Resting Place


This was another fine night to sleep in the van. It was warm and I could touch the stars from the window by my head. Dominique had another night in the guestroom.

Lloyd had a special treat for our breakfast. He taught us a camping recipe to mix raw eggs and omelet ingredients in a freezer-weight plastic bag. Squish this up and then squeeze all the air out of the bag. Seal the seam tightly. Place in a pot of boiling water for at least 10 minutes.
Boil in a Bag Omelets

Boil in a Bag Omelets


They're Done

They're Done


Then, wonderful omelets slid out of the bag and on to your plate!

Try it, you'll like it.

Posted by pscotterly 10:16 Archived in USA Tagged idaho Comments (0)

Days 5 1/2 through 6 - On the Road with Dominique

Snow Again!

We spent our last morning in Yellowstone visiting the Mammoth Hot Springs.
Mammoth Hot Springs

Mammoth Hot Springs


After a walk in the wind around the hot springs, we headed on for a five hour drive to Stevensville, Montana. We had originally planned to stay in Bozeman with a Couch Surfing host, but he had to cancel. My friends in Stevensville said to keep driving a few more hours and rest up with them for two nights.
The wind slowed and the sun came out. We stopped for lunch in Gardiner, Montana.

Now, as I scroll my camera, I see we didn't capture any photos of this leg of the trip. Highway 89 wends its way through beautiful valley. Then we turn on to Interstate 90 to cross over Bozeman Pass.
It is really not such a high pass - about the same altitude as Denver. The previous evening at the Inn, I had talked with locals about this route and was confident there would not be any problems.
Mother Nature had to show Dominique one more thrill.
First, we were in a low-slung cloud. Then it was a snow cloud, Then it was a blizzard.
At one point a sheriff's car was in the left lane with flashing lights. Further down the road, another although the flashing lights were not visible until we were within about 20 feet. By now, there was an inch of slushy snow on the highway. After passing about six sheriff cars spaced about 200 feet apart, we finally arrived at the wreck that was blocking the left lane.
I figured all sheriff cars in the county were already warning us of the wreck I just passed; there would be none available to warn of us another one. Driving Ol' '95 is like handling a box on wheels. Remember, for over 30 years I have driven AWD Audis and Subarus! There was no way I was going to go over 45 down that mountain. Some vehicles passed me; some chose to follow.
Another problem has to do with my windshield wipers. Their function is a little sporadic; they switch from 2 wipes a second to 2 wipes a minute without any help from me. It seems when a truck passes, they switch to the slower speed.
By the time we got to Bozeman, I was shot.
I stopped at a gas station and chatted with a trucker. He said we had another pass about 60 miles away that crossed the Continental Divide. (By the way, the concept of a continental divide was new to Dominique. I had never stopped to think that the average school child in Europe does not learn about the European watershed as we do in our grade school geography class.)
I decided to stop at the local Microtel - my favorite low-cost motel along the highway,
Aperitifs at the Microtel

Aperitifs at the Microtel


The snow continued most of the night. In the morning, the Rocky Mountain sun was out doing its job and we were on our way to Missoula.
A River Runs through Missoula

A River Runs through Missoula


On the trip West with my grandparents and aunt that I wrote about in the previous entries, we also visited Missoula, Montana. My grandfather's sisters had homesteaded in Glendive, Montana. At some point, they left Glendive and owned a hotel in Missoula. I remember staying there on this trip. Once again, I was disappointed because it was not a highrise city hotel or as fancy as the Old Faithful Inn.
During this visit, I located what I thought was the facility - currently apartments. I learned it was originally built as a rooming house for railroad employees and it was managed by different on-site female managers. I think one of these was my great aunt Mandy and that my other great aunt and her husband turned it into a hotel when housing was no longer required by the railroad. I might have this all mixed up and plan to do a little further research....one of these days.
Is This the Place

Is This the Place


Another Courthouse Under Renovation

Another Courthouse Under Renovation


The courthouse across the street is currently being renovated. This seems to be a big effort in county seats and state capitols across the western states.
I learned that Bernie Sanders was speaking just blocks away from me. Dominique asked "Who is that? I don't know that man."
Had I been on my own, I would have gone to hear him speak, but decided not to because she was with me. Then, I got a great big chip on my shoulder because I made that decision. Shame on me.
We Eat Bernie Speaks

We Eat Bernie Speaks


Crowds Leave the Bernie Speech

Crowds Leave the Bernie Speech


Missoula has rivers on more than one side. I am not sure which is the Bitterroot and the Clark Fork.
Surfing in the River

Surfing in the River


It is a charming university town. One could spend a few days there puttering around and enjoying the museums, shops, and healthy living.
I always head to my friends' place south of town for some of their good hospitality on the hill.
Up the Lane to the Schwartzmans

Up the Lane to the Schwartzmans


We had a good time chatting, laughing, and enjoying a fine meal of chicken and fresh asparagus.
Steve's Ready Where are the Women

Steve's Ready Where are the Women


At Table with Tina and Steve

At Table with Tina and Steve


Dominique had a great room with en suite. It was an absolutely perfect night for me to bed down in the van - stars and no rain or snow in sight,

Posted by pscotterly 10:01 Archived in USA Tagged montana Comments (1)

(Entries 51 - 60 of 66) « Page 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 »